Features

Western bean cutworm

OVERWINTERING BEHAVIOUR AND BIOLOGY

IN THE SPACE of five seasons, the Western bean cutworm (WBC) has spread to become a well-established threat across Ontario. The question is, how? Researchers from the University of Western Ontario (UWO) are trying to [Read more]

Features

Features

Split nitrogen application on corn

U.S. STUDIES QUESTION BENEFITS

SEVERAL FACTORS — INCLUDING the drive to improve yields, pressures to use less nitrogen (N) or use it more effectively, the availability of high clearance equipment — are prompting more U.S. grain producers to try [Read more]

Features

Collaborative field crop research

IMPROVING GENETICS

THIS YEAR MARKS an important milestone in Canadian field crop genetics research. Results are being finalized for 12 projects in the Canadian Field Crop Genetics Improvement Cluster — a collaboration between the Canadian Field Crop [Read more]

Features

Defining roots to defy drought

SOYBEAN WATER STRESS RESEARCH

EVEN IN A wet year, if soybeans don’t get rain in a critical week, that water stress shows during harvest. However, some varieties seem to fare better than others, and researchers at the University of [Read more]

Features

Fighting off Fusarium head blight

DEVELOPING ONTARIO-ADAPTED VARIETIES

DEVELOPING NEW WINTER wheat varieties that are better able to resist Fusarium head blight (FHB), a complex and stubborn disease that can destroy whole crops, is the goal of the research efforts of Dr. Ali [Read more]

Features

Location, location, location

THE COMPETITIVE LAKE ONTARIO EXPORT MARKET

ONE OF THE most encouraging things to watch in the Ontario grain markets through the 2017 harvest period was how strong cash basis levels have remained despite a rather large crop both within Ontario, and [Read more]

Also in this issue

Also in this issue

Continuing the conversation

ONTARIO FARMERS OPEN UP ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES

2017 WAS A difficult production year for farmers across Canada. Unpredictable weather was an enormous source of stress for growers; this, paired with ongoing concerns about insect, disease, and weed pressures and government regulations — many farmers [Read more]

Also in this issue

History lessons to advance agriculture

SYMPOSIUM USES PAST TO HIGHLIGHT POTENTIAL FUTURE

THE FUTURE OF agriculture will be fueled by lessons from history. This was discussed in depth during the second annual DuPont Pioneer Plant Sciences Symposium held in Guelph. Advertised as the Historical Guide to Modern [Read more]

Also in this issue

The consumer conversation

2017 GEORGE MORRIS AGRIFOOD POLICY LECTURE

HOW DOES THE agriculture industry talk to consumers about food? A look through a different lens can reveal answers to this question. This topic was part of the George Morris AgriFood Policy lecture hosted by [Read more]

Flipbook

February 2018

Read the Flipbook version of this issue.

Web special

Pelee Island Farming

Production
GRANT CRAWFORD SAYS he can relate to the September 2017 Ontario Grain Farmer Magazine article about the challenges grower Jason Pyke faces farming on an Island compared to mainland farmers. In fact, he believes farming [Read more]

From the CEO’s desk

  • ADVANCEMENTS IN CROP management and new seed varieties have helped farmers increase their yields in recent years. We are now growing more grain on less land than ever before. That’s a positive for our industry [Read more]

GFO Newsletter

Market Side

Cropside

Business Side