Ontario Grain Farmer
The magazine of Grain Farmers of Ontario
SEPTEMBER 2014
FEATURES
Combine maintenance
Tony Palermo
Proper grain storage
Rachel Telford
Tragedy results in education
Erin Calhoun
Similar but not the same
Blair Andrews
Palmer Amaranth
Edith Munro
Spring versus fall strip tillage
Melanie Epp
Soybean prices
Treena Hein
Representation for oat and barley
Meghan Burke
Common ground at IOPD conference
Jeanine Moyer
ALSO IN THIS ISSUE
Grains in Action Summitt
Mackenna Roth
The future of Ontario winter wheat
Erin Calhoun
Leading by example
Rachel Telford
IN EVERY ISSUE
The blame game
From the CEO's Desk
GFO Newsletter for September 2014
GET THE LATEST NEWS FROM GRAIN FARMERS OF ONTARIO
Business side: Measuring instincts
CONVERSATIONS WITH BUSINESS EXPERTS
In the news
NEWS BITES THAT MATTER
Future of Grain
HIGHLIGHTING THE LATEST TECHNOLOGY IN GRAIN PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION
Cropside: What's infecting soybeans?
AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS
Research roundup
FIND OUT WHAT'S NEW IN THE WORLD OF RESEARCH
YOUR TURN
WEB SPECIAL
PREVIOUS ISSUES
November 2010

November 2010
Cropside: When corn looks dead
By: Greg Stewart, Corn Specialist and Albert Tenuta, Field Crop Pathologist, Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs
IDENTIFYING THE CULPRIT behind dead-looking corn can be challenging. Use the following information and photos to help remove the mystery surrounding physiological and disease causing reasons for dead-looking corn.Not all top die back is disease related.  However, in some cases leaf diseases place an extra stress on the plant’s ability to fill the ear and this hastens senescence. Under these conditions the plant tends to cannibalize itself as it moves carbohydrates from the leaves and
November 2010
Research Roundup
By:
HIGH OIL SOYBEANS in the worksJoey SabljicIn the search for greener, alternative fuels, soybeans are among Ontario’s most available, renewable and cheapest sources of oil for biodiesel production. However, the main drawback is that most domestically grown soybean varieties only contain about 20 percent oil, compared to other oils such as canola (44 percent) or sunflower (50 to 55 percent). A research team from the University of Guelph, led by Dr. Istvan Rajcan from Plant
November 2010
New young leader chosen
By: Meghan Burke, Grain Farmers of Ontario
GRAIN FARMERS OF ontario has selected Jessica Schouten as the Canadian representative for the 2011 American Soybean Association (ASA) and Dupont Young Leader Program. The program offers an excellent opportunity to help train Ontario’s future farm leaders. Participants benefit from lessons in public speaking and exposure to successful farm leaders. The greater farm industry benefits from the future potential of well trained leaders.After reviewing several applications, Jessica was
November 2010
Growing the right grain
By: Jeanine Moyer
HEALTHY AND WHOLE wheat are two terms often used interchangeably with consumers these days. The trend to eat whole grains because it’s healthier is popular, but consumers are resisting whole wheat products and processers want to know why. To answer that question, processors and end users of Ontario wheat have teamed up with researchers and breeders. This unique collaboration will determine how to make whole wheat products more acceptable to consumers while making sure Ontario wheat farmers
November 2010
Pesticide residue report misleading
By: Lilian Schaer, AGCare
THE USE OF crop protection materials in our food production is a source of ongoing debate – and much of it gives little credence to solid, scientific evidence. Earlier this summer, a US activist group released its yearly list of fruits and vegetables – the so-called “Dirty Dozen List” – they say consumers should avoid eating because they contain the highest levels of pesticide residues.The list, which included consumer favourites like peaches, strawberries, blueberries, apples and cherries,
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