Ontario Grain Farmer
The magazine of Grain Farmers of Ontario
JUNE/JULY 2017
FEATURES
Uncertainty for U.S. agriculture
Edith Munro
Market opportunities in China
Erin Calhoun
The sustainability supply chain
Michael Buttenham
Better future for subsistence farmers
Marika Li
Project Canaan
Megan Veldman
Breaking new ground in Alaska
Melanie Epp
ALSO IN THIS ISSUE
Same, same but different
Meghan Burke
Leading through change
Rachel Telford
The WBC problem
Shawn Brenneman
WBC 101: ID and control
Tracey Baute, Art Schaafsma, and Jocelyn Smith
Instagram ambassadors
Good in Every Grain
IN EVERY ISSUE
Agricultural growth
FROM THE CEO'S DESK
GFO Newsletter for June/July 2017
GET THE LATEST NEWS FROM GRAIN FARMERS OF ONTARIOGET THE LATEST
Market side: Futures trading basics
LESSON 28: TECHNICAL ANALYSIS
Cropside: Corn stand checkup
AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTSAGRON
Business side: Life insurance
CONVERSATIONS WITH BUSINESS EXPERTS
WEB SPECIAL
Update: 2017 ASA DuPont Young Leader
DUPONT YOUNG LEADER PROGRAM
PREVIOUS ISSUES
March 2016

March 2016
Crown rust conundrum
By: Amy Petherick
SOME GROWERS ARE most familiar with oats as a cover crop but crown rust doesn’t discriminate — whether for pony oats, human consumption, or as cover crop, this disease can have a devastating impact on the crop. Oat breeders are faced with a new challenge as crown rust is proving a real issue to breeding advancements.  Using oats as a cover crop may increase the level of crown rust inoculum in the fall, says Albert Tenuta, field crop plant pathologist with the Ontario Ministry of
March 2016
Research roundup
By: --
HIGH LINOLEIC SOYBEAN oil now available for product trials Lilian Schaer, Soy 20/20High linoleic soybean oil from a new Ontario soybean variety under development at the University of Guelph is now available in limited quantities for industrial product development trials.This oil is extracted from a new soybean variety, OAC 13-55C-HL, originally developed at the University of Guelph by the late Dr. Gary Ablett for potential food use. It is now being looked at for its potential in
March 2016
Next generation biotech
By: Melanie Epp
TWO SCIENTISTS, JENNIFER Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier, have invented a new technology for editing genomes, a technique called CRISPR-Cas9, which could be used not only to cure human diseases, but also has applications in plant biotechnology. While research is in its very early stages, Doudna thinks we could see clinical trials in humans and possibly approved therapies in the next 10 years. The CRISPR technology came about through a basic research project. The project’s goal was to
March 2016
Weathering the storm
By: Edith Munro
DESCRIBING HIMSELF AS ‘Dr. Doom’, Iowa State professor Chad Hart spent much of the winter farm show season delivering grim economic news for farmers. His message was aimed at Iowa-area corn and soybean growers, who are facing much lower grain prices than Ontario’s farmers, but his tips for getting fixed and input costs inline still ring true here. Whether it’s corn or soybeans, Hart says demand has been good, but not good enough to soak up three years of record or near-record corn
March 2016
Business side: Succession law
By: Robert S. Fuller, Partner Brimage Law Group
BUSINESS SIDE WITH...  Robert S. Fuller, Partner Brimage Law Group(R.H.) WHAT LEGAL DOCUMENTS ARE IMPORTANT FOR FARM FAMILIES GOING THROUGH A TRANSITION? (R.F.) The top legal concern I encounter in agriculture is a succession planning one, whether it includes the drafting of wills, providing ownership in the farm to the next generation, dealing with estate taxes, or otherwise. The most important documents are wills, power of attorney, and shareholder or partnership agreements
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