Ontario Grain Farmer
The magazine of Grain Farmers of Ontario
APRIL/MAY 2017
FEATURES
Sustainability goals
Michael Buttenham
Call before you cut
Lois Harris
Hunting on farmland
Treena Hein
A modern renewable fuel standard
Rachel Telford
Grains in Action
Maegan MacKimmie
How do you know what works - and what doesn't
Joey Sabljic
ALSO IN THIS ISSUE
Preventing vomitoxin
Erin Calhoun
Celebrating plant science
Amy Petherick
IN EVERY ISSUE
Trade in the Trump era
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Business side: Business opportunities
CONVERSATIONS WITH BUSINESS EXPERTS
GFO Newsletter for April/May 2017
GET THE LATEST NEWS FROM GRAIN FARMERS OF ONTARIO
Market side: Futures trading basics
LESSON 27: TECHNICAL ANALYSIS
Cropside: Spring cereals planning
AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS
WEB SPECIAL
Reducing the impact of high DON levels
PROPER STORAGE KEY
PREVIOUS ISSUES
August 2016

August 2016
Duelling priorities
By: Lyndsey Smith
MILLING QUALITY IS king when it comes to oat. While farmers look for disease resistance, standability, and big yields, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s (AAFC’s) oat breeder Weikai Yan has to first ensure a new line of oat produces the plump, white, high beta-glucan grain that end-users demand.  “The driving force (for choosing lines) is the milling industry,” Yan says, “but farmers have to be happy to grow it.” Finding that balance is a challenge — oat is a food crop first,
August 2016
Research roundup
By: --
SERENDIPITY FROM SCIENCESAMEER ChhabraMaize enzymes could hold the secret to maximizing plant growth potential — that’s according to a molecular and cellular biology professor at the University of Guelph.Professor Michael Emes inserted maize genes into a strain of the Arabidopsis plant that could not produce starch. He was surprised to discover that not only could the plant make starch again, but the modified plant grew to almost twice the size as the control group. The altered
August 2016
Renewable resources
By: Owen Roberts
WHEN THE CANADIAN Renewable Fuels Association (CRFA) was launched in 1984, its members were mostly focused on advancing new energy sources. The promise of ethanol and other biofuels had stimulated the imagination of the farming community. A turning point had begun for producers, who were envisioning new uses for their commodities. Once, they saw only food and feed as end uses for their harvests. Now, fibre and fuel were being mentioned in the same conversations.Since the association’s
August 2016
Struggling to adopt cap and trade
By: Amy Petherick
WHEN THE ONTARIO government announced its intention to join the Western Climate Initiative this April, few would have guessed new regulations would be effective by July. Although confusion still reigns, increased energy costs are certain.In order to cut greenhouse gas emissions 15 per cent below 1990 levels in the next four years, the government will target energy use through a cap and trade system. While agriculture is not targeted specifically in this round of the regulations, there
August 2016
Farm it like you own it
By: Jeanine Moyer
HOW IS THE rising price of land and increasing farmland rental rates impacting farm management and production practices? A recent University of Guelph study asked that question, comparing farm and production practices on owned and rented land. This study builds on a longstanding research area by Dr. Brady Deaton, University of Guelph professor and McCain Family chair in food security. The recent study was conducted by Deaton in collaboration with Dr. Chad Lawley from University of Manitoba and
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