Ontario Grain Farmer
The magazine of Grain Farmers of Ontario
APRIL/MAY 2017
FEATURES
Sustainability goals
Michael Buttenham
Call before you cut
Lois Harris
Hunting on farmland
Treena Hein
A modern renewable fuel standard
Rachel Telford
Grains in Action
Maegan MacKimmie
How do you know what works - and what doesn't
Joey Sabljic
ALSO IN THIS ISSUE
Preventing vomitoxin
Erin Calhoun
Celebrating plant science
Amy Petherick
IN EVERY ISSUE
Trade in the Trump era
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Business side: Business opportunities
CONVERSATIONS WITH BUSINESS EXPERTS
GFO Newsletter for April/May 2017
GET THE LATEST NEWS FROM GRAIN FARMERS OF ONTARIO
Market side: Futures trading basics
LESSON 27: TECHNICAL ANALYSIS
Cropside: Spring cereals planning
AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS
WEB SPECIAL
Reducing the impact of high DON levels
PROPER STORAGE KEY
PREVIOUS ISSUES
November 2016

November 2016
Mapping yield and elevation data
By: Joey Sabljic
EVERY SINGLE FIELD has its own story to tell. And this story can be about the highly productive, organic matter-rich areas that supply high yields — and the droughty knolls that perform poorly every season. Knowing the full story of a field can help growers adopt a precision agriculture approach and tailor their inputs to benefit their land, boost profitability and reduce their overall environmental impact. But what kind of information or data do growers need to find out exactly
November 2016
Knowledge transfer
By: Natalie DiMeo
EVERY YEAR, GRAIN Farmers of Ontario invests nearly $2 million in research. This investment is targeted towards four priority areas — agronomy and production, weeds, diseases, and insect pests, breeding and genetics, and crop quality and utilization.  More than 60 projects are currently underway in conjunction with industry and government partners. “Our goal is to target our research and innovation investments toward opportunities that will enhance our farmer-members’
November 2016
Soil technology
By: Farm & Food Care Ontario
AT CANADA’S OUTDOOR Farm Show, one can’t help but notice machinery getting bigger each year. But when it comes to new technology in the agriculture industry, the biggest developments are not in iron or horsepower; in fact, they are practically invisible.  PHOTO: TESTING SOIL MICROBES TO DETERMINE WHICH ARE MOST FUNCTIONAL TO THE PLANTSoil microbes are so tiny that it would take over a thousand of them lined up in a row to stretch across the period at the end of this sentence.
November 2016
Managing residue for best results
By: Erin Calhoun
STRONGER, TOUGHER HYBRIDS don’t only mean more productive, higher-yielding crops — they also mean an increase in residue left post-harvest that growers need to manage. PHOTO: FARMERS PARTICIPATE IN A RESIDUE MANAGEMENT FIELD DAY IN ELMIRA.“There’s at least two times as much stalk now compared to when no-till systems were first introduced,” says Pat Lynch, certified crop advisor. “Residue is now staying on top of the soil, and when it breaks down, takes away from the biological
November 2016
The "future" of glyphosate
By: Melanie Epp
AS OF AUGUST 22, 2016, new restrictions around the use of glyphosate came into force in the European Union (EU). The restrictions came on the tail of two months worth of failed talks where a consensus on the reauthorization of glyphosate could not be reached between Member States. As a result, the European Commission granted an 18-month extension to the chemical’s authorization within the EU. For farmers, no decision is better than an agreement of non-renewal. If Member States had
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