Ontario Grain Farmer
The magazine of Grain Farmers of Ontario
JUNE/JULY 2017
FEATURES
Uncertainty for U.S. agriculture
Edith Munro
Market opportunities in China
Erin Calhoun
The sustainability supply chain
Michael Buttenham
Better future for subsistence farmers
Marika Li
Project Canaan
Megan Veldman
Breaking new ground in Alaska
Melanie Epp
ALSO IN THIS ISSUE
Same, same but different
Meghan Burke
Leading through change
Rachel Telford
The WBC problem
Shawn Brenneman
WBC 101: ID and control
Tracey Baute, Art Schaafsma, and Jocelyn Smith
Instagram ambassadors
Good in Every Grain
IN EVERY ISSUE
Agricultural growth
FROM THE CEO'S DESK
GFO Newsletter for June/July 2017
GET THE LATEST NEWS FROM GRAIN FARMERS OF ONTARIOGET THE LATEST
Market side: Futures trading basics
LESSON 28: TECHNICAL ANALYSIS
Cropside: Corn stand checkup
AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTSAGRON
Business side: Life insurance
CONVERSATIONS WITH BUSINESS EXPERTS
WEB SPECIAL
Update: 2017 ASA DuPont Young Leader
DUPONT YOUNG LEADER PROGRAM
PREVIOUS ISSUES
January 2017

January 2017
Cropside: OCC trials
By: Ben Rosser, Corn Industry Program Lead, Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs
A COMMON QUESTION regarding Ontario Corn Committee (OCC) hybrid trials is — how valid are results if practices on my farm are more intensive than the hybrid trials? To help answer this, Intensive Management (IM) trials were conducted at eight OCC hybrid trial locations as a two-year pilot project in 2015 and 2016. A key objective of the IM trials was to investigate the nature of yield response between “standard” and “intensive” management practices (Table 1) across many different hybrids.
January 2017
Where do management zones make sense?
By: Joey Sabljic
GROWERS MIGHT KNOW from experience that they have areas in their fields that consistently deliver high yields season after season — and other parts that just aren’t very productive at all. But is having that knowledge enough for growers to optimize inputs and yield potential in each area of a field so that their overall profitability is higher and their environmental impact is lower? This, say researchers from the Precision Agriculture Advancement for Ontario (PAAO) project team,
January 2017
Chairing corn seed production quality
By: Amy Petherick
SEED CORN GROWERS in southwestern Ontario produce some of the best quality seed in the world and the reasons why are clearly exemplified by Jeff Wilson.PHOTO: JEFF AND JENNIFER WILSON.Wilson is the current chair of the Seed Corn Growers of Ontario. He and his wife Jennifer operate a fifth generation farm in Charing Cross, Ontario. Wilson says that when he started farming in 1978 with his Dad, a lot of things about the farm were different. At one point, they had dairy cattle, beef
January 2017
Barley intensification
By: Jeff Robinson with Amy Petherick
AT THE 2016 harvest, we saw much less barley come to market in the Guelph area. Many Ontario barley growers were down on average yields, but there were still a lot that were above average. West of Guelph, for example, there was almost a direct line of growers who got rain and they got an awesome yield. There may be small shortages in some areas, but look out, the county over may have seen a surplus.Grain Farmers of Ontario reports 34,886 tonnes were sold between May 1 and October 31.
January 2017
Market side: Futures trading basics
By: Marty Hibbs, Grain Farmers of Ontario
MARKET SIDE WITH...MARTY Hibbs, Grain Farmers of OntarioThis monthly educational series will feature the basic workings of the futures and options markets and how they can be utilized to help farmers with risk management.THIS LESSON WE will discuss the descending triangle formation and how to trade it.The descending triangle is a bearish formation that usually forms during a down-trend and it is typically a continuation pattern. A bearish pattern indicates that the price of
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