Ontario Grain Farmer
The magazine of Grain Farmers of Ontario
APRIL/MAY 2017
FEATURES
Sustainability goals
Michael Buttenham
Call before you cut
Lois Harris
Hunting on farmland
Treena Hein
A modern renewable fuel standard
Rachel Telford
Grains in Action
Maegan MacKimmie
How do you know what works - and what doesn't
Joey Sabljic
ALSO IN THIS ISSUE
Preventing vomitoxin
Erin Calhoun
Celebrating plant science
Amy Petherick
IN EVERY ISSUE
Trade in the Trump era
--
Business side: Business opportunities
CONVERSATIONS WITH BUSINESS EXPERTS
GFO Newsletter for April/May 2017
GET THE LATEST NEWS FROM GRAIN FARMERS OF ONTARIO
Market side: Futures trading basics
LESSON 27: TECHNICAL ANALYSIS
Cropside: Spring cereals planning
AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS
WEB SPECIAL
Reducing the impact of high DON levels
PROPER STORAGE KEY
PREVIOUS ISSUES
February 2017

February 2017
The utilization of Ontario grain
By: Rachel Telford
THE MAIN OBJECTIVES of Grain Farmers of Ontario’s Market Development department are to create new markets and expand existing markets for Ontario grains. To better achieve these goals, a market utilization study was conducted in partnership with Synthesis Agri-Food Network in 2016.“One of our biggest challenges has been the lack of a complete dataset for Ontario for market utilization and disposition,” says Nicole Mackellar, manager of Market Development for Grain Farmers of Ontario.
February 2017
Mitigating mycotoxins
By: Erin Calhoun
MYCOTOXINS ARE TOXIC chemicals produced by fungi that infect crops. Some of the mycotoxins most commonly found in grain include Aflatoxin, Deoxynivalenol (DON), and Ochratoxin. They have a significant negative economic impact on the Ontario grain industry, yet there is currently no cost effective, efficient, and reliable way to sample and detect them on-farm. Grain is sampled after it leaves the farm gate at an elevator or processing facility. This leaves the grower unaware of the level of
February 2017
A regional approach
By: Jeanine Moyer
ONTARIO SOYBEAN GROWERS have a pretty good handle on soybean diseases — the biggest threats, diseases to watch for and field management practices. New research, assessing the distribution and pressure of soybean diseases in the province will help overall disease management in one of the Ontario’s most economically important field crops.Dr. Owen Wally, field crop pathologist and research scientist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, is taking a regional approach to field crop
February 2017
Developing local barley
By: Owen Roberts
MOST PEOPLE DRIVEN to buy local food and beverages have clear expectations. They figure the ingredients in the products they’re purchasing will be grown or raised within a certain distance of their homes — say, within 100 miles, a classic definition of “local”. And they’d like to think that if they really wanted to, they could drive by the farms where the ingredients were grown, or raised, and have their belief in local confirmed. But as commodities become processed goods, remaining
February 2017
Bacteria control of disease
By: Treena Hein
SEVERAL TYPES OF bacteria are the focus of ground-breaking new Fusarium research here in Ontario. PHOTO: BACTERIA M6.Professor Manish Raizada of the Department of Plant Agriculture at the University of Guelph, with colleagues Dr. Victor Limay-Rios and Masters student Charles Shearer, along with Dr. Walaa Mousa (who is now at McMaster University and achieved her PhD under Raizada’s supervision) is figuring out how best to use bacteria to control Fusarium head blight in wheat and
   1 of 2   
 
© Copyright Grain Farmers of Ontario. All Rights Reserved. | SITEMAP | ABOUT US | CONTACT US