Ontario Grain Farmer
The magazine of Grain Farmers of Ontario
APRIL/MAY 2017
FEATURES
Sustainability goals
Michael Buttenham
Call before you cut
Lois Harris
Hunting on farmland
Treena Hein
A modern renewable fuel standard
Rachel Telford
Grains in Action
Maegan MacKimmie
How do you know what works - and what doesn't
Joey Sabljic
ALSO IN THIS ISSUE
Preventing vomitoxin
Erin Calhoun
Celebrating plant science
Amy Petherick
IN EVERY ISSUE
Trade in the Trump era
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Business side: Business opportunities
CONVERSATIONS WITH BUSINESS EXPERTS
GFO Newsletter for April/May 2017
GET THE LATEST NEWS FROM GRAIN FARMERS OF ONTARIO
Market side: Futures trading basics
LESSON 27: TECHNICAL ANALYSIS
Cropside: Spring cereals planning
AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS
WEB SPECIAL
Reducing the impact of high DON levels
PROPER STORAGE KEY
PREVIOUS ISSUES
April/May 2017

April/May 2017
Celebrating plant science
By: Amy Petherick
THERE’S A TRICK to selling real, good news in the ‘fake news’ and the ‘if it’s on the internet it must be true’ world we are living in. Not that long ago, it seemed like no one in the agricultural industry could figure out what that trick was. That’s not true anymore. Agriculture is slowly but surely becoming recognized as a partner in the fight against climate change. Investors watch stocks for companies focused primarily on farming. Food is akin to medicine for many people.
April/May 2017
Cropside: Spring cereals planning
By: Joanna Follings, Cereals Specialist, Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs
AS WE GET into the busy planting season and think about our spring cereals, it is important to keep a few things in mind to help get that cereal crop started off right!TARGET THE OPTIMUM PLANTING DATE AND SEEDING RATESimilar to winter wheat, spring cereals are very responsive to planting date. The earlier you can get your spring cereals planted, the better.  In southwestern Ontario, the ideal planting date is April 10, while the ideal planting date for central and eastern parts of
April/May 2017
Market side: Futures trading basics
By: Marty Hibbs, Grain Farmers of Ontario
MARKET SIDE WITH...MARTY Hibbs, Grain Farmers of OntarioThis monthly educational series will feature the basic workings of the futures and options markets and how they can be utilized to help farmers with risk management.GAP TYPES - PART ONEGAPS OCCUR AT different positions on a price chart. The position of the gap on the chart has a direct bearing on the name of that particular type of gap. The four gaps that we will explore over the next two lessons will be discussed in the
April/May 2017
GFO Newsletter for April/May 2017
By: --
PRODUCTION INSURANCE — NEW FORAGE SEEDING Production insurance coverage is now available for an expanded range of crops, including brassica, cereal, grasses, and legume species. They include: •    Alfalfa •    Annual rye grass •    Bird’s-foot trefoil •    Bluegrass •    Brome grass •   
April/May 2017
Hunting on farmland
By: Treena Hein
IN 2015, 23,000 people took the Ontario Hunter Education Course, according to the provincial Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF), and a total of 450,000 people currently hold a ‘Hunting’ Outdoors Card. While there are millions of acres of crown land for hunters to access, many are keen to enter local farmland for deer, wild turkey, migratory waterfowl, partridge, moose, elk, bear, and other wild game. What do farmers need to know, when approached by a hunter for
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