Ontario Grain Farmer
The magazine of Grain Farmers of Ontario
JUNE/JULY 2017
FEATURES
Uncertainty for U.S. agriculture
Edith Munro
Market opportunities in China
Erin Calhoun
The sustainability supply chain
Michael Buttenham
Better future for subsistence farmers
Marika Li
Project Canaan
Megan Veldman
Breaking new ground in Alaska
Melanie Epp
ALSO IN THIS ISSUE
Same, same but different
Meghan Burke
Leading through change
Rachel Telford
The WBC problem
Shawn Brenneman
WBC 101: ID and control
Tracey Baute, Art Schaafsma, and Jocelyn Smith
Instagram ambassadors
Good in Every Grain
IN EVERY ISSUE
Agricultural growth
FROM THE CEO'S DESK
GFO Newsletter for June/July 2017
GET THE LATEST NEWS FROM GRAIN FARMERS OF ONTARIOGET THE LATEST
Market side: Futures trading basics
LESSON 28: TECHNICAL ANALYSIS
Cropside: Corn stand checkup
AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTSAGRON
Business side: Life insurance
CONVERSATIONS WITH BUSINESS EXPERTS
WEB SPECIAL
Update: 2017 ASA DuPont Young Leader
DUPONT YOUNG LEADER PROGRAM
PREVIOUS ISSUES
June/July 2017

June/July 2017
Instagram ambassadors
By: Good in Every Grain
GRAIN FARMERS OF ONTARIO’S newest group of Good Grain Farmers will be taking over the Good In Every Grain Instagram account this year. From April 2 to December 2, one of the Good Grain Farmers will share what’s happening that week on their farm, with the goal of connecting rural and urban communities with farmers through social media.Instagram is a photo and video sharing application that can be used on a computer or mobile device. The use of ‘hashtags’ and ‘linking’ help users find
June/July 2017
WBC 101: ID and control
By: Tracey Baute, Art Schaafsma, and Jocelyn Smith
NATIVE TO NORTH America, the Western bean cutworm (WBC), Striacosta albicosta, has been a long-time resident of the U.S. Great Plains region until it began expanding its range eastward and was first detected in Ontario in 2008. Overwintering populations have established here and WBC has become one of the most significant management challenges for Ontario corn producers. PHOTO: LIFE CYCLE OF WESTERN BEAN CUTWORM IN ONTARIO (ONE GENERATION PER YEAR).DAMAGEWBC larvae initially
June/July 2017
Cropside: Corn stand checkup
By: Ben Rosser, Corn Industry Program Lead, Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs
COUNTING LEAVESTHERE ARE several ways to count corn leaves. While this seems like a mundane detail, ensuring you and your agronomist are communicating the same leaf stage can be important, especially when management practices or crop protection products require specific leaf stages for crop safety. In Ontario, the leaf-over counting method is commonly used on product labels. A quick review of all three methods is shown on the left.COUNTING PLANTSIf you’ve had plant stand issues
June/July 2017
Leading through change
By: Rachel Telford
FARMERS NEED TO adapt to changes in social expectations and political agendas while facing the economic and environmental challenges of maintaining a successful farm business. It’s not always clear what the next big issue will be, so it’s important to have the right tools to deal with any situation that comes along. As business owners, farmers need to lead through change.At the 2017 March Classic, Grain Farmers of Ontario’s annual conference, four guest speakers provided inspirational
June/July 2017
GFO Newsletter for June/July 2017
By: --
GRAIN FARMERS OF ontario announces vice presidentGrain Farmers of Ontario is pleased to announce that Crosby Devitt will be joining the organization as Vice President. He will start in this role on June 6. Devitt comes to Grain Farmers of Ontario from the position of Executive Director of the Canadian Seed Trade Association. Prior to this position, he held the roles of Vice President of Strategic Development and Research Manager at Grain Farmers of Ontario. “We are happy to
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