Ontario Grain Farmer
The magazine of Grain Farmers of Ontario
MARCH 2017
FEATURES
Farming the Great Clay Belt
Tony Palermo
A sustainable nutrient plan
Michael Buttenham
Late nitrogen insights
Greg Stewart
Go slower, spray more
Dr. Jason Deveau and Dr. Tom Wolf
Managing resistance
Erin Calhoun
Midwestern crop threat
Edith Munro
ALSO IN THIS ISSUE
Emerging corn diseases
Edith Munro
Crown rust in oats
Melanie Epp
Citizen scientists
Tony Palermo
Experiences from the Field
Joey Sabljic
IN EVERY ISSUE
Issues that matter
From the CEO's desk
Market side: Futures trading basics
LESSON 26: TECHNICAL ANALYSIS
Business side: Insuring the business
CONVERSATIONS WITH BUSINESS EXPERTS
GFO Newsletter for March 2017
GET THE LATEST NEWS FROM GRAIN FARMERS OF ONTARIO
Cropside: Perennial sow-thistle
AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS
WEB SPECIAL
PREVIOUS ISSUES
April 2010

April 2010
The Big Picture: Balancing bias
By: Claire Cowan
AGRICULTURE IS FULL of scientific certainty and research-driven results. Decisions on how much fertilizer to apply, what crop protection product to use and when to sell a crop all require careful measurements. A science-based approach to farming is becoming more important every day as farmers perform their own strip trials, utilize variable rate technology and monitor their own weather systems. But despite all this science and measurement, agriculture is still rife with emotional discussion,
April 2010
Research Roundup
By:
TREATMENT FOR LONG-SPINE sandbur control in cornCarolynn SeatonPost-emergence herbicides are more effective than pre-emergence herbicides for controlling long-spine sandbur, a problem weed in corn on sandy soils in southwestern Ontario. Long-spine sandbur grows rapidly in open spaces and competes for moisture, nutrients and light. The weed can reduce yields, harvesting efficiency and grain quality if its seeds get into the grain. Pre-emergence herbicides, such as Prowl, have
April 2010
In the news
By:
HENSALL TO GET bean processing facilityThe Eastern Canadian division of grain company Parrish and Heimbecker, Limited (P&H) recently announced plans to invest in a new, state-of-the-art, dry edible bean processing facility in Hensall, Ontario. The project development plans indicate that ground-breaking is imminent.Located in the heart of Huron County, this new investment sends a strong and supportive signal to Ontario’s 2,000 navy bean (white pea bean) producers says the
April 2010
Replanting Roundup Ready
By: Claire Cowan
AS THE FIRST company to patent and commercialize a genetic trait in commercial agriculture, eyes are on Monsanto as they also become the first company to deal with the expiration of a patent.The first generation Roundup Ready soybean trait (RR1) was patented in 1991 and as Canadian patent law stipulates, it expires 20 years later. Come August, 2011, RR1 will be the first widespread plant biotechnology trait scheduled to go off patent. According to patent law, it is not possible to extend the
April 2010
Site-specific disease forecasting
By: Kerry-Sue Lang
DESPITE YOUR BEST efforts to grow profitable, high quality, disease-free cereal crops, the biggest challenge remains the weather.  While we still can’t control it, science and technology are taking us a lot closer to at least implementing best management practices to counter the negative impact weather conditions can cause.“Diseases are driven by the disease triangle made up of pathogens, crops and environment. We can predict two sides of the disease triangle fairly accurately,” says
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