Also in this issue

Western Bean Cutworm

MANAGING RESISTANCE

WESTERN BEAN CUTWORM (WBC) is a significant threat to corn fields in Ontario. WBC feeding reduces yield and can cause contamination of grain with mycotoxins. Rotating methods of WBC control is important to mitigate the [Read more]

Cropside

Cropside: WBC thresholds/timing

AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS

DELAYS IN PLANTING over the last few years have, in many regions, aligned the corn stages that the Western bean cutworm (WBC) moth prefers to lay her eggs on (pre-tassel to full tassel) and peak [Read more]

Also in this issue

WBC 101: ID and control

SCOUTING AND MANAGEMENT IN FIELD CORN

NATIVE TO NORTH America, the Western bean cutworm (WBC), Striacosta albicosta, has been a long-time resident of the U.S. Great Plains region until it began expanding its range eastward and was first detected in Ontario [Read more]

Cropside

Cropside: Scout for BMSB

AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS

BE ON THE lookout for brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB). This new invasive species has spread across Ontario over the last few years, finding warm homes to overwinter in and host trees to establish on [Read more]

Cropside

Cropside: Corn rootworm control

AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS

THE LATEST DEVELOPMENT of resistance to at least one rootworm Bt trait in the U.S. Corn Belt has been fast and widespread.  This indicates that the general population of beetles possess the genetics needed to [Read more]

No Picture
Features

Reducing the risk to pollinators

AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS

STEPS TO TAKE THIS PLANTING SEASON A HIGH LEVEL of concern was raised last spring regarding bee kills and corn planting. Many growers are asking what actions they can take to help reduce the risk [Read more]

Cropside

Cropside: Western bean cutworm watch 2011

AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS

PHOTO 1. WBC EGGS Extensive trapping of the Western bean cutworm (WBC) moths has taken place over several years. However, trap counts do not equal damage levels in fields. Traps only indicate moth presence and [Read more]

Cropside

Cropside: Slug management starts in the fall

AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS

Slug damage can be one of the biggest challenges to achieving a good soybean stand. In severe cases replanting may be necessary. Feeding can resemble hail damage, but damaged leaves have more of a “skeleton” [Read more]