Also in this issue

The WBC problem

AVOIDING THE DAMAGE OF 2016

LAST SEASON WAS officially the worst year on record in Ontario for Western bean cutworm (WBC) feeding damage. What’s even more troubling is that cutworm feeding damage was also a major contributor to high deoxynivalenol [Read more]

Also in this issue

WBC 101: ID and control

SCOUTING AND MANAGEMENT IN FIELD CORN

NATIVE TO NORTH America, the Western bean cutworm (WBC), Striacosta albicosta, has been a long-time resident of the U.S. Great Plains region until it began expanding its range eastward and was first detected in Ontario [Read more]

Cropside

Cropside: Corn stand checkup

AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS

COUNTING LEAVES There are several ways to count corn leaves. While this seems like a mundane detail, ensuring you and your agronomist are communicating the same leaf stage can be important, especially when management practices [Read more]

Features

Call before you cut

REMOVING TREES ON FARMLAND IN ONTARIO

GRAIN FARMERS LOOKING to cut trees or clear brush on their property should consult with their local municipality about woodcutting bylaws and follow good forestry practices to maintain their soil, preserve wildlife habitat, and potentially make money. [Read more]

Also in this issue

Preventing vomitoxin

TIPS FOR A HEALTHY CORN CROP

VOMITOXIN (ALSO KNOWN as deoxynivalenol (DON)) can severely compromise the quality of a corn crop, limiting both its use and value. In 2016, the annual vomitoxin survey to assess the presence of corn ear mould and grain vomitoxin, conducted by the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) field crops team, confirmed the concerns being raised by many farmers. [Read more]

Features

Late nitrogen insights

ANSWERS TO KEY QUESTIONS

THERE IS UNPRECEDENTED interest and investment in applying nitrogen (N) on corn later in the season. By later, we mean applications that are beyond the traditional planting or sidedress timings and generally between the V10 to VT (tassel emergence) stages. Some key questions and answers have been gradually coming to light as we aim to shift more of the corn crop’s N supply to later in the season. [Read more]

Features

Farming the Great Clay Belt

NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR GROWTH

A MARCH 31, 2016 article in Northern Ontario Business titled Beef farmers look to gain ground in the Clay Belt says “the North’s climate limits what cash crops can be grown, but the fertile soil is perfect for growing hay, oats, and grazing cattle”. [Read more]

Features

Go slower, spray more

AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS

IN AN EFFORT to get more done in a day, and to ensure sprays are applied during an ever-shrinking window of opportunity, sprayer operators may be tempted to drive faster. Certainly, sprayer manufacturers have supported this strategy by making self-propelled sprayers capable of high speeds. However, just because you can drive 25 mph doesn’t mean you should. [Read more]