Features

Plant tattoos

IOWA RESEARCH TARGETS LOW-COST SENSORS

RESEARCHERS AT IOWA State University (ISU) are developing low-cost sensors, called “tattoos,” which can be attached to plants to measure key agronomic conditions such as moisture and nitrogen levels. The technology can measure how corn [Read more]

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Order of Canada

SOYBEAN BREEDING PIONEER RECOGNIZED

THIS FALL AT Rideau Hall, when Governor General Julie Payette calls on Canadian crop breeding icon Dr. Harvey Voldeng to come forward and accept his Order of Canada officer award, applause will ring out from [Read more]

Features

DON testing protocols

DURING THE SEVERE outbreak of DON in corn during the 2018 harvest season, Grain Farmers of Ontario partnered with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, the Ontario Agri-Business Association, and the University [Read more]

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Making fertilizer work in strip-till

A PROFILE OF TWO RESEARCH PROJECTS

AS MORE FARMERS investigate the potential of strip-tillage, and as nutrient runoff issues continue to be a major environmental concern, more effort is being invested in understanding nutrient management between conventional and no-till systems. Since [Read more]

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Controlling weeds before wheat

MULTIPLE FACTORS TO CONSIDER

THERE IS NO universal method of weed control. This is particularly true when managing the growth and spread of problem weeds on fallow land, and in a compressed growing season. According to ministry and academic [Read more]

Features

Detoxifying DON

NEW SOIL BACTERIA RESEARCH

IN 2018, ONTARIO farmers battled one of the most severe DON outbreaks in corn. Crops with vomitoxin levels above the accepted threshold can’t be sold into feed markets, which means growers get stuck shouldering big [Read more]

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Gene editing

CANADIAN BARRIERS AND PERCEPTIONS

GENE-EDITING TECHNOLOGY has the potential to revolutionize crop and animal development globally. For Canadian researchers, however, the federal government’s ambiguous and slow-moving regulatory system is preventing new agricultural products from reaching farmers and consumers alike. [Read more]

Features

Genetically modified wheat?

BREAKTHROUGH DEVELOPMENT FOR CELIACS

ONE OF THE public’s long-time raps against genetically modified crops is that their main benefits have accrued to farmers, not consumers. But an international breakthrough in wheat breeding aimed at helping celiac disease sufferers could [Read more]

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Precision Ag Advancement for Ontario

NEW TOOL FOR UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH

RESULTS FROM THE 2016 and 2017 growing seasons in the Precision Agriculture Advancement for Ontario project can now be found through an interactive story map available online at http://bit.ly/2wIVgGq. The story map can show multiple [Read more]