Cropside

Cropside: When corn looks dead

AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS

IDENTIFYING THE CULPRIT behind dead-looking corn can be challenging. Use the following information and photos to help remove the mystery surrounding physiological and disease causing reasons for dead-looking corn. Not all top die back is [Read more]

Cropside

Cropside: Residue management for wheat

AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS

PROPER PRACTICES BEGIN WITH HARVEST OF THE PREVIOUS CROP UNEVEN RESIDUE DISTRIBUTION causes many problems in wheat planting, growth and development.  Proper residue management to avoid these pitfalls is critical. wreaking havoc Increased residue levels [Read more]

Cropside

Cropside: Ready for the new crop

AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS

system cleanout All components of the grain handling and storage system should be thoroughly cleaned of old grain. This includes unloading sumps, distributors, augers, elevator boot and the dump pit. Bins should be treated with [Read more]

Cropside

Cropside: Corn flowering fundamentals

AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS

SCOUT YOUR FIELDS AT THIS CRITICAL PERIOD OF GROWTH knowing the stages The VT stage in corn development begins when the last tassel branch is visible.  This will generally occur two to three days before [Read more]

Cropside

Cropside: The right seeding depth?

AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS

KEEP DEPTH IN MIND WHEN PLANTING SOYBEANS A NEWLY PLANTED soybean seed is completely dependent on its reserve of energy to push through the soil.  In general, larger seeds contain more energy and can be [Read more]

Cropside

Cropside: Dead or alive?

AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS

GET OUT INTO your winter wheat fields and assess the crop in the early spring!  Every spring calls come in about wheat going backwards.  The reality is you didn’t assess those fields closely enough in [Read more]

Cropside

Cropside: Ear moulds and implications

AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS

Gibberella ear rot The most common and important ear mould in Ontario is Gibberella zeae which is the sexual reproductive stage of Fusarium graminearium Infection often begins at the ear tip and moves down towards [Read more]

Cropside

Cropside

AGRONOMIC INFORMATION FROM ONTARIO'S CROP SPECIALISTS

NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT IN SOYBEANS SOYBEANS ARE THE largest row crop in the province and remove a tremendous amount of nutrients from the soil every year.  A 50 bushel per acre crop will remove 40 pounds per [Read more]