Future of grain

HIGHLIGHTING THE LATEST TECHNOLOGY IN GRAIN PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION

Boosting soil health
The Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association (OSCIA) supports cover crop research through its Soil Health Graduate Scholarship fund. The 2015 recipient, graduate student Jaclyn Clark, for her graduate thesis, explores June cover crop planting into standing corn. By the time harvest is finished in September or October, the cover crop will have a head start on plant growth.

“Cover crop research across Ontario must be at record levels this year,” says Gord Green, president of the OSCIA. “Most counties across southern Ontario will have a handful of farmers with experiments of cover crop to capture left over nutrients at the end of the season and also improve soil health, which contributes to better water holding capacity.”

“With drought extending across southern Ontario for much of June and July in 2016, soils that have a long history of best management practices have been showing more resilience to drought,” says Dr. Bill Deen, soil scientist in Plant Agriculture at the University of Guelph and supervisor of Clark’s research. “It is believed that cover crops can play an important role for soil to fulfill all its functions over time and also improve the diversity of soil biota to support soil as a vital living system.”

“My research involves inter-seeding two cover crop species (one legume, red clover, and one grass, annual ryegrass) singly and in combination into corn at the V5 growth stage at three locations across southern Ontario,” says Clark in describing her research. “There will be two harvest treatments, one for silage (all corn residue removed early in the fall) and one for grain (cobs removed, residues remain in field late in the fall). Two planting methods of the cover crops will be investigated: drilling and broadcasting. These factorial treatments help to fill multiple gaps in the literature on the potential for cover crop inclusion in a corn-soy rotation. Corn yields (involving grain or silage dry matter) and above ground biomass of cover crops will be measured, as well as soybean yields in the subsequent season. Data collected can be combined with known soil and weather data to make interpretations based on seasonal or locational context, accounting for the variability inherent to agriculture.”

This research is being done in collaboration with Dr. Dave Hooker from Ridgetown Campus and Dr. Mehdi Sharifi from Trent University. •

Who are you following?
Farmers are using Twitter to stay connected and up to date with industry news. Each month, Ontario Grain Farmer magazine will highlight Twitter accounts we think you should consider following or hashtags (#) that will help you join specific conversations.

@HustonFarms
Mark Huston has been the director for Grain Farmers of Ontario District 2 (Kent) and vice chair of the Board of Directors since the organization was formed in 2010. He farms 1,300 acres of corn, soybeans, and wheat with his father, Larry, and uncle, Terry, north of Thamesville. Huston is also the Chair of Soy Canada (@Soy_Canada).

@GoodinGrain
Whether in our food, fuel, or furniture, every grain brings a natural and sustainable solution to our everyday lives. From the farmers in the fields to the wholesome food on tables across Ontario… there’s Good in Every Grain. Follow Grain Farmers of Ontario’s public outreach campaign to see how and where we are spreading this message across the province. •

The Digital Toolbox
The smartphone, tablet and computer are important tools on today’s farms. Each month, Ontario Grain Farmer magazine will highlight an app, online tool, or website that may help you in the field or in the farm office.

The Bottom Line
New look, same great content delivered to you every week.

Subscribe to The Bottom Line, the weekly e-newsletter that helps Grain Farmers of Ontario farmer-members stay on top of the news that affects their bottom line. The weekly email features grain market prices, the weekly Marketing Education series by Grain Farmers of Ontario grain merchandiser Marty Hibbs, and important grain farming news and events from the organization, government, and industry.

Subscribe to The Bottom Line at www.gfo.ca/subscribe. •

About Ontario Grain Farmer 362 Articles

THE ONTARIO GRAIN FARMER magazine strives to be the number one source of information for our province’s grain farmers. With a balanced mix of production, marketing, technology, research, and general interest articles, we provide farmers with valuable information in an easy-to-read format.

As the flagship publication of Grain Farmers of Ontario, the Ontario Grain Farmer is a magazine that is made by farmers, for farmers. The magazine is an important tool that supports the organization’s vision to drive the Ontario grain industry to become a global leader.